Premier Analytical Services

FOOD AUTHENTICITY   >> FOOD COMPOSITION   >> FOOD SAFETY   >>
COMPREHENSIVE NUTRITION SERVICECOMPREHENSIVE VITAMINS AND MINERALS SERVICEFOOD ADDITIVES SERVICEINVESTIGATIVE MICROSCOPY
ALLERGENSCHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS DETECTION SERVICESMICROBIAL SHELF LIFE ASSURANCE TESTINGFOREIGN BODY IDENTIFICATIONFOOD AND PACKAGING TAINTSFOOD SAFETY CONSULTANCY SERVICES
MEAT AUTHENTICITYDNA TESTING PROGRAMMESGM DETERMINATION

Illegal Dye Testing

PAS offers a UKAS accredited illegal dye testing service that includes a total of 21 dyes and colours and offers detection limits down to 10ppb by LC/MS/MS.

Please contact us for further information. 

 

Illegal colours included in the screen (as recommended by the UK Food Standards Agency)

 

Sudan 1                                               Sudan Orange G

Sudan II                                               Rhodamine B

Sudan III                                              Para Red

Sudan IV                                             Toluidine Red

Butter Yellow                                       Sudan Red G

Metanil Yellow                                     Auramine O

Sudan Red B                                       Fast Garnet

Sudan Red 7B                                     Orange II

Bixin                                                    Norbixin

Nitroaniline                                          Sudan Black B            Orange OT

 

Background

The colours permitted for use in food are defined in the Colours in Food Regulations 1995 and in subsequent amendments. Therefore the presence, at any level, of any other colours is illegal.

 

There were two incidents in 2008 involving illegal Sudan dyes in imported spices form India. Sudan dyes are synthetic, industrial dyes traditionally used for colouring waxes, plastics, oils and shoe & floor polishes and therefore not permitted in food at any level. However, the deep red colour was perceived to enhance the aesthetic qualities of some foods for example, spices (such as chilli powder and paprika) and palm oil.

 

More recently, several ingredients have been implicated in food scares involving illegal colours, for example Methyl Yellow in curry powder in Belgium, France & Germany and safflower (natural colour) from China containing Orange II. It is vital therefore that food manufacturers remain alert to the potential use of illegal dyes in their supply chains.

 

In late June 2006 the FSA circulated details of the adoption of a harmonised Europe-wide approach for dealing with incidents of contamination of spices and other food ingredients with illegal dyes. This is based upon the ‘’As Low As Reasonably Practicable’’ approach, recognising adventitious rather than deliberate contamination may be present at very low levels. As such an action limit of 0.5ppm has been established, such that detection at levels below 0.5ppm should not trigger removal of products from the market. 

FIRST FOR FOOD ANALYSIS
FIRST FOR SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY